Vintage wooden steamer bobbins 1800's era

$12.00

Vintage wooden brass-ended steamer bobbins from industrial era textile mills. These rustic wood spools are heavily lacquered and have holes running the length of the barrel. Brass and steel ends with a gorgeous patina have denting and cracking that enhances their rustic, primitive nature. 

NOTE: If you select a bobbin that has sold out, I will replace your selection with the closest one in size and price. Leave me a note in Message to Seller at checkout with your first choice of replacement. Also I always refund shipping overpayments without request. Haven't had one complaint yet!

The wooden bobbin is a bit of textile history. Made to last and used during a time when organic was how all fiber was farmed. Victorian textile mills developed wooden bobbins and spools to organize the threads on their looms, completely transforming the way textiles were produced during the industrial revolution. Each bobbin is shaped differently, this one has steam holes for when yarns needed steaming to reduce excess twist. The red lacquer finish kept the damaging steam out of the wood, lengthening the life of the bobbin. Steamer bobbins were also used for dyeing fibers, as the holes would allow the dyes to be absorbed evenly throughout the yarn. 

These unusual, vintage wooden steel & brass-capped spinner and winder bobbins were designed to be used for wool and cotton threads. Today they're for rustic industrial displays for your store or home, organizing wayward fiber stashes, ribbon storage and if you're handy, make stellar coat hooks. Due to 1900's changeover to steel alloy, brass and copper capped bobbins are more difficult to find. Get these while they're in stock!

The wooden bobbin is a bit of textile manufacturing and industrial era history beginning in the 1800's that you can hold and display, today. These vintage and antique wooden bobbins were made to last, re-use, not toss. Victorian textile mills developed a wide variety of wooden bobbins and spools to spin thread and organize those threads on their looms, completely transforming the way textiles were produced during the industrial revolution.